Sustainability claims made by major retailers are being questioned.

Sustainability claims made by major retailers are being questioned.

According to a new report by UK-based consumer research consultancy Impact, retailers must “do more to convince consumers of their environmental commitment.”

According to a new report by UK-based consumer research consultancy Impact, retailers must “do more to convince consumers of their environmental commitment.”

Sustainable shopping is now one of the top five reasons when choosing a shop, according to a poll of 6,000 UK customers.

The Body Shop (78.4), Lush (69.4), Waitrose (68.7), Co-op (68.2), and Marks & Spencer (66.7) had the highest sustainability scores, followed by Waitrose (68.7) and Waitrose (68.2).

People think these top five retailers are ecologically friendly (65%), socially responsible (69%) and financially viable (58%).

Customers are wary.

However, only 37% of buyers feel The Body Shop is deeply concerned about environmental issues. 40% think the retailer cares about the products’ origin.

About 40% of respondents believe Lush cares about the environment, which is close to the second-highest scorer.

Retailers need to convince consumers of their environmental concerns, according to Impact’s research. The most effective retailers employ visual cues to support their claims and establish authentic marketing.

Instead of vague promises for the future, consumers want proof that retailers are making progress towards sustainability.

Sustainability is becoming more essential to customers, according to Impact Research Director Tom Gould. According to 64% of those polled, the news has influenced their views on plastic packaging.

Our research demonstrates that consumers expect shops to address media-driven challenges. To be taken seriously by consumers and prevent controversy, businesses must communicate environmental issues correctly and in the right areas.

Consumers say shops must inspire change.

Even though most customers rated merchants well for sustainability, Gould told Retail Insight Network that consumers have little faith in retailers’ true commitment to the cause.

Consumers are becoming more concerned about the environment as movies like Blue Planet and environmental calamities like the Australian bushfires make news.

In our poll, slightly under 90 percent of consumers feel firms should do more to prevent climate change.

« Despite strong scores on sustainability issues, the results show a lack of trust in the shops’ sustainable messaging. Consumers like merchants’ environmental and social marketing, but don’t think they care about the issues.

This may explain the high levels of scepticism in some circumstances where sustainable message has been adopted. Consumers quickly accuse brands and shops of ‘greenwashing’ when their public image does not mirror their private practises.

“Recent concerns of fast fashion’s environmental impact may explain why the fashion industry is the most sceptical.

What can merchants do?

“Retailers need to be real to be seen as truly sustainable,” Gould told Retail Insight Network. To convince people, marketers must present visual proof.

“Detail is vital. It is not enough to say you will be NetZero by 2030; detailing how you will get there builds trust. Even the most real, thorough messages will not get through unless they are communicated to the correct people and through the appropriate channels.

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